Publictransit.us
Man Up, Antiplanner! - 1 PDF Print E-mail
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Thursday, 23 December 2010 13:33
Leroy W. Demery, Jr.

A recent bit of sleight-of-hand by the (self-styled) Antiplanner, a.k.a. our loyal “frenemy” Randal O’Toole, suggests the above variation on a catch phrase from a recent U.S. political campaign.

Whether advertently or not, O’Toole presented a statistic that was more than ten times greater than the value stated by an authoritative source.

As a “numbers geek,” I’d describe O’Toole’s figure as incorrect- by more than one order of magnitude. In effect, O’Toole shifted the decimal point one place to the right - and then some.

This is more than a mere rhetorical point - or grist for one of those cheap shots that I like to make on occasion (e.g. “Anti-math from an anti-planner ... no surprises here”).

Body of article is here: http://www.publictransit.us/ptlibrary/ManUp_Antiplanner_1.htm.
 
Wendell Cox and his population density daffiness - 1 PDF Print E-mail
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Thursday, 23 December 2010 13:11
We find it difficult to understand why Wendell Cox continues to expend time and effort comparing the gross population densities of various cities and metropolitan areas - without reference to other important parameters, such as land area.

This might make sense if there was a point to make. However, the relationship between gross population density - nothing else considered - and transportation needs, traffic levels and so forth is less strong that Cox implies (albeit tacitly). Professionals and advocates know this well, and we believe that Cox does, too.

Old habits die hard, we suppose.

Body of article here: http://www.publictransit.us/ptlibrary/Wendell_Density_Dense_1.htm.
Last Updated on Thursday, 23 December 2010 13:42
 
Japan: Where's the gadgetbahn? 2 PDF Print E-mail
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Thursday, 23 December 2010 11:56
By Leroy W. Demery, Jr.

As asserted previously, I am a skeptic when it comes to the concept of Personal Rapid Transit (PRT). I believe that, if there is a country where (PRT) "should" work and "should" already have been built, it's Japan. Furthermore, I have seen specific locations that, from the perspective of empirical observation of the built environment, appear "tailor-made" for PRT. I assert that it is perfectly reasonable to ask, with reference to these specific locations, "Where's the PRT?" The dialogue on this particular topic might prove very interesting.

(I have also stated previously that neither I nor my associate, Michael D. Setty coined the word gadgetbahn. I shall consider myself free to use "that word" with impunity, with reference to PRT or other public transport technology or service, prospective or not, for as long as my name or that of Michael Setty is associated with its coining.) Body of article is here: http://www.publictransit.us/ptlibrary/Japan_Wheres_the_gadgetbahn_2.htm.
Last Updated on Thursday, 23 December 2010 11:58
 
Density: Of population - and between the ears PDF Print E-mail
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Thursday, 23 December 2010 13:06
Certain loyal and disloyal opponents expend significant time and effort comparing gross population densities of various urban areas - without reference to land areas, the factors which determine administrative boundaries, and so forth.

Some countries and sub-national jurisdictions facilitate the growth of cities through annexation of adjacent others. Others restrict or prevent this, in some cases on a "city-specific" basis. One very good example, described previously, is Paris.

The share of land within municipal boundaries that is not "built up" varies greatly among cities. This is true even with reference to cities located within the same country. An interesting "compare and contrast" exercise includes the cities of Ōsaka and Sapporo, Japan.

Body of article is here: http://www.publictransit.us/ptlibrary/Sapporo_Density.htm.
 
Japan: Where's the gadgetbahn? - 1 PDF Print E-mail
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Tuesday, 07 December 2010 17:12
By Leroy W. Demery, Jr.

Introduction

If there is a country where Personal Rapid Transit (PRT) "should" work and "should" already have been built, then it's Japan.

Having traveled extensively throughout that country over the past three decades, I shall take this a step farther: if there is a place in Japan where PRT "should" work - and "should" already been built - then it's _____.

One could fill in the "blank" above with a number of locations, based on empirical observation of the built environment. During the past five years, maps and aerial photo images became available online and quality has been improved steadily. It is now possible to study the urban geography of Japan, "armchair" style, whether or not one has any knowledge of Japanese. This series shall present several examples of locations in Japan where the built environment appears conducive to PRT development. It shall also consider results obtained by other transport modes, e.g. automated guideway transport (AGT), in specific locations.

For rest of story, see http://www.publictransit.us/ptlibrary/PRTSkeptic1_2010_12_03.htm.
Last Updated on Tuesday, 07 December 2010 17:26
 
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